Secure Collaboration - Collaboration Process Framework

Transform your current collaboration strategy to maximize secure, productive interchange while ensuring compliance and protecting intellectual property.

Today, in many products, the majority of the constituent components are outsourced beyond the boundaries of the product builder. Consequently, those involved in value chain management recognize the importance of suppliers, both vendors and partners, in producing product and meeting customer expectations. An area of increased importance over the past decade relates to offloading the design and manufacture of parts to partners and key vendors in the supply chain who have a core competency in the nature of the part.

One thing is clear, and it is a lesson learned repeatedly, ignore collaboration impacts on your project at your own peril. This is a logical way to navigate the dependencies on clarity of design intent and collaboration formats, intellectual property protection, regulatory compliance (e.g. ITAR & EAR), and schedule. TransR understands the problems and more importantly how to lead your team to the correct solution.

There are three interrelated processes in a collaboration framework: Collaboration Planning, Collaboration Provisioning, and Collaboration Execution.

TransR Secure Collaboration - Collaboration Process Framework

Collaboration Planning

Most well run organizations identify key suppliers, partners and critical customers fairly early in the new product introduction process. However, it’s important to not only know who the collaborating agents are, but also what is the nature of the collaboration.

Many information items can be involved in collaboration. Examples include items like schedule status; design, manufacturing, quality, purchasing and service information; governing regulatory compliance; supplier and partner qualification information; and expected duration of the compliance.

Two of the most critical pieces of information in product collaborations are CAD design and Product Structure. There are four types of interchange:

Internal Homogeneous

Internal Homogeneous collaboration refers to the circumstance in which collaboration internal to the company is performed using identical CAD and Product Structure control systems. This is ideal for groups within an organization to maximize interoperability.

Internal Heterogeneous

Internal Heterogeneous collaboration refers to the circumstance in which collaboration internal to the company is performed using different CAD and Product Structure control systems. Unfortunately even within an organization this is fairly common. It often results from slow migration from one platform to another; loose enforcement of standardization; mergers and acquisitions; or a group rationalizing the need to leverage capability in a system not considered the standard.

External Heterogeneous

External Heterogeneous collaboration refers to the circumstance in which collaboration external to the company is performed using different CAD and Product Structure control systems. This is obviously the most complex and demands the most up front planning to avoid project cost and schedule overruns.

External Homogeneous

External Homogeneous collaboration refers to the circumstance in which collaboration external to the company is performed using identical CAD and Product Structure control systems. It is rare that partners, suppliers and customers have the same systems, at the same revision with critical configuration settings matching.

Collaboration Provisioning

Once it’s established with whom and about what information the collaboration will center, the next step is to establish the protocols, formats and the system translated roles and responsibilities in all the affected collaborating environments. This is laborious, but is the cornerstone of the how efficiently the various collaborating parties will interact. Given an effective collaboration plan, many of the provisioning tasks can be relegated to routine IT infrastructure administration. Without a collaboration plan, time delays are inevitable, intellectual property may be compromised, and regulatory compliance may be sacrificed. The problems begin to manifest themselves at the time when chaos is at its peak like when urgent deadlines approach or long lead collaboration items become the critical path items.

Collaboration Execution

Given that the collaboration plan was established, and given that the collaboration provisioning occurred, collaboration execution revolves around the interaction of the collaborating parties. Actual individuals from a particular supplier, partner or customer come and go during the course of any one project. They have a start time and end time as do their companies. Their individual citizenships and countries of origins may vary within the company. The tools for which they need access may vary. It’s natural to expect as a project evolves there will be iteration on the planning and the provisioning, and that for each collaboration activity there will be the need to monitor the individuals involved and the tools they require to effectively accomplish the collaboration.

TransR understands the problems associated with effective collaboration and more importantly how to lead your team to the correct solution.

Secure Collaboration - Collaboration Architecture

Transform your current collaboration architecture to utilize Attribute Based Access Control(ABAC) for flexible, productive and secure interchange.

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